Cherry

Where it Grows
Throughout Midwestern and Eastern U.S. Main commercial areas: Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and New York. Average tree height is 60 to 80 feet. Cherry trees can live to the extreme ages of 150 to 200 years.

Main Uses
Fine furniture and cabinet making, mouldings and millwork, kitchen cabinets, paneling, flooring, doors, boat interiors, musical instruments, turnings and carvings.

Relative Abundance
3.9 percent of total U.S. hardwoods commercially available.

Did You Know?
Early printmakers used cherry for their engraving blocks.

General Description
The heartwood of cherry varies from rich red to reddish brown and will darken with age and on exposure to light. In contrast, the sapwood is creamy white. The wood has a fine uniform, straight grain, satiny, smooth texture, and may naturally contain brown pith flecks and small gum pockets.

Grades of Cherry:

Sel&Better:
Sel&Better Grade Cherry
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#1 Cherry:
#1 Cherry
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#2 Cherry:
#2 Cherry
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Working Properties
Cherry is easy to machine, nails and glues well and when sanded and stained, it produces an excellent smooth finish. It dries fairly quickly with moderately high shrinkage, but is dimensionally stable after kiln-drying.

Physical Properties
The wood is of medium density with good bending properties, it has low stiffness and medium strength and shock resistance.

cherry wood properties chart